Ecumenism

BA (Hons) in Theology - Year 1
COURSE UNIT 345

UNIT DESCRIPTION

The unit introduces students to various issues and approaches in the field of ecumenical relationships, with a view to helping them elucidate their own approach to ecumenism in ministry.  It begins with an exploration of biblical and theological rationales for ecumenical engagement.  There follows a survey of the history of ecumenism in its various forms, both nationally and globally, with special reference to Baptist involvement and attitudes.  Specific practical and theological issues are then addressed, including the development of ecumenical relationships at the local level, reading the Bible ecumenically, ecumenical thinking on ecclesiology, the practice of ecumenical dialogue, and the relationship of ecumenism and mission.

Aims

To enable students to develop an ecumenical perspective on ministry.

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Category of outcome

By the end of this unit students should be able to:

Knowledge and understanding

·         Outline the history of the ecumenical movement in its various forms

Intellectual skills

·         Evaluate the main theories and models of ecumenism

·         Develop a considered response to the challenges presented by the need to relate to other Christian communities

Practical and Transferable skills; Personal qualities

·         Conduct ecumenical talks

·         Conduct independent research

·         Present a paper in class

Assessment:

Assessment task

Length

Weighting within unit

Formative:

·         A presentation in class

 

15 minutes

 

n/a

Summative:

·         An essay

 

3000 words

 

100%

FURTHER INFORMATION

Semester

 

Available on which programme(s)?

BA in Theology

Content

1.    Introduction

2.    Biblical notions

3.    A theological rationale for ecumenical engagement

4.    The history of the ecumenical movement

5.    Ecumenism in Great Britain

6.    Baptist involvement and attitudes

7.    Ecumenical relationships at local level

8.    Reading the Bible ecumenically

9.    Ecumenism and ecclesiology

10.  The practice of ecumenical dialogue

11.  Ecumenism and mission

Teaching method

Interactive lectures

Additional eLearning content

Unit materials are available at Spurgeon’s Online to support student learning

Feedback

Written feedback within 15 working days from submission

Date of approval (for office use)

 

Information updated on

December 2015

Indicative reading

Avis, Paul (ed.), Paths to Unity: Explorations in ecumenical method (London: Church House Publishing, 2004)

Bebbington, David W., Evangelicalism in Modern Britain: A History from the 1730s to the 1980s (London: Routledge, 1994)

Bilheimer, Robert S., Breakthrough: the emergence of the ecumenical tradition (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1989)

Butler, David, Dying to be One: English Ecumenism - History, Theology and the Future (London: SCM, 1996)

Carpenter, Jenny, Together Locally: A handbook for local churches seeking to work together (London: CTE, 2002)

Chadwick, Owen, The Christian Church in the Cold War (London: Allen Lane, 1992)

Gros, Jeffrey, et al., Introduction to Ecumenism (New York: Paulist, 1998)

Hastings, Adrian, A History of English Christianity, 1920-2000 (London: SCM, 2001)

Hollenweger, Walter J., Pentecostal Origins and Developments Worldwide (Peabody: Hendrickson, 1997)

Hylson-Smith, Kenneth, The Churches in England from Elizabeth I to Elizabeth II, Volume III: 1833-1998 (London: SCM, 1998)

Meyer, Harding, transl. William G. Rusch, That they all may be One: Perceptions and Models of Ecumenicity (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1999)

Worrall, Bert G., The Making of the Modern Church (London: SPCK, 1993)

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Ecumenism

BA (Hons) in Theology - Year 1
Course Unit 345

Credits:

10

Level:

4

Hours of Learning:

100

Tutor:

Pro Tem – Director of Studies

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